Aller au contenu principal

Africa’s urbanisation and structural transformation

Blogs 04/08/2016

By Patrick Love

We don’t know the name, or the place and exact date of birth, of the baby who changed world history. My guess is that she was born somewhere in Africa in 2007. Not that she cared as she lay there all wrinkled and raging at the disagreeable turn her life had just taken, but it was thanks to her that for the first time ever, the world had more urban dwellers than country folk.

We don’t know the name, or the place and exact date of birth, of the baby who changed world history. My guess is that she was born somewhere in Africa in 2007. Not that she cared as she lay there all wrinkled and raging at the disagreeable turn her life had just taken, but it was thanks to her that for the first time ever, the world had more urban dwellers than country folk.

Africa itself won’t pass that landmark until sometime in the 2030s, but when you look at the numbers rather than the percentages, you can see why this year’s African Economic Outlook from the OECD Development Centre, African Development Bank, and UNDP is focusing on “Sustainable Cities and Structural Transformation”. In 1990, Africa was the world’s region with the smallest number of urban dwellers: 197 million. Now it has more than twice that at 472 million, and the urban population is expected to almost double again between 2015 and 2035. By 2020, Africa is forecast to have the second highest number of urban dwellers in the world (560 million) after Asia (2348 million).

Click here to read the full blog at the OECD Insights blog



Click here to read more blogs

Communiqué de presse

Il faut libérer le potentiel des entrepreneurs africains pour accélérer la transformation industrielle du continent, selon les Perspectives économiques en Afrique 2017.

À propos

AfricanEconomicOutlook.org  est le site web qui offre des données et des analyses complètes et comparables pour 54 économies africaines.